Catalogue by titles / Empty Cradles: One Woman's Fight to Uncover Britain's Most Shameful Secret

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ISS/IRC Code COM-ADOPT 037
Partner
Title Empty Cradles: One Woman's Fight to Uncover Britain's Most Shameful Secret
Author HUMPHREYS Margaret
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General information
Date published/issue 00-00-1994
Date received 00-00-0000
Place published
Editor
Publisher Transworld Publishers LTD, 61-63 Uxbridge Road, London W5 5SA, United Kingdom
Distributor
Page 325
Price
ISBN 0385 404522
Type of material Book
Language of document

Document information
Document description
Country concerned AUSTRALIA
CANADA
ZIMBABWE
Index Secrecy-origin
Foster-care
Substitute-family
Child-rights
Consent
Identity-origin
Institution-child
Adoption
Abuse
Neglect
Free text Margaret Humphreys is the founder and Director of the Child Migrants Trust, supported by Nottinghamshire Council. In this book she tells the unbelievable story of the thousands of British children sent by boatloads mostly to Australia but also to Canada and other destinations early on at the beginning of the Twentieth Century under the Empire Settlement Acts of 1922 and 1937, through to the mid-sixties. The author describes her battle over a number of years to have the British and Australian governments' agencies, charities and church run children's homes responsible for those migrations to admit to them and help the now adults who grew up far from their families, without information on their background, and who had to sometimes live through terrible abuse and neglect in their new countries to find their true identity and families. Domino Films supported the work of Mrs. Humphreys and the Child Migrants Trust and produced a documentary called Lost Children of the Empire with the participation of a number of adult child migrants living in Australia. The Leaving of Liverpool was a dramatization re-enacting the lives of a couple of such children who were taken to Australia.

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