Catalogue by countries / Adoption as a Placement Choice: Arguments and Evidence

Documentation presentation
ISS/IRC Code COM-ADOPT ENG-012
Partner
Title Adoption as a Placement Choice: Arguments and Evidence
Author RUSHTON Alan
Generic unit

General information
Date published/issue 00-00-1999
Date received 00-00-0000
Place published
Editor
Publisher Kings College London, Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, de Crespigny Park, London S
Distributor
Page 22 p
Price £2.95
ISBN
Type of material Leaflet
Language of document

Document information
Document description Commentaries
Evaluation
Country concerned
Index Foster-care
Interacial
Adoption-open
Family-reintegration
Failure-placement
Paps-info-counsel
Placement
Adoption-domestic
Child-interest
Adopt-fam-post-adopt-sup
Free text Maudsley Discussion Paper No. 9. The choices for children in care, with special focus on adoption, today in the United Kingdom reviewed in eight questions. Adoption as an option is presented with recently voiced arguments for and against it. Key points discussed include: support to birth families as a form of prevention of disruption requiring the placement of children, with warnings on the frequency of readmission into care in some cases and possible delays in providing these children with early, permanent and stable homes - much more extensive family preservation services would seem to be necessary for success in maintaining certain children at home; permanent foster family care could be considered as an option for some children depending on circumstances, but more research would be needed of outcomes of these arrangements; the emphasis on precise same-race matchings should be secondary to the choice of carers with "appropiate parenting skills, experience and tenacity"; open adoptions need to be considered on a case by case basis, depending on individual situations; sibling placements on the whole seem to be beneficial to the children, as long as emphasis is placed on proper intervention when needed to improve relationships within the sibling group. With the present shift to "special needs" placements (children who are older, abused, disabled, ethnic minority and mixed heritage origin and sibling groups), the need for pre- and post-placement assessment and support for adoptive or foster parents is emphasised, as well as better organised and funded campaigns to recruit potential carers

Document qualification
Degree of interest Valuable
Work area Social work -->
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